Dedicated to Your Health

0800 043 7103

Dedicated to Your Health

Book Now

Throughout your diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation, dedicated team members will continue to work hard to ensure you can get back to enjoying life with the most comfort, mobility, and functionality possible.

Healthplus Clinics has assembled a group of Ankle Pain Specialists to provide complete surgical and non-surgical treatments. Our team of Ankle Specialists includes: Ankle Surgeons, Pain Specialists, Podiatrists, and specially trained Ankle Physiotherapists.

Anatomy of Ankle

Ankle AnatomyThe ankle is made up of 4 distinct bones, the tibia, fibula, talus and calcaneus. The interaction between these bones allows for movement of the joint in certain directions. In turn, the ankle is made up of 3 separate joints:

  • Talocrural Joint: This is a hinge joint formed by the distal ends of the fibula and tibula that enclose the upper surface of the talus. It allows for both dorsiflexion (decreasing the angle between the foot and the shin) and plantarflexion (increasing the angle).
  • Inferior Tibiofibular Joint: This is a strong joint between the lower surfaces of the tibia and fibula. This is supported by the inferior tibiofibular ligament.
  • Subtalar Joint: This joint comprises the articulating surfaces of the talus and the calcaneus. It provides shock absorption and the movements of inversion and eversion (inward and outward ankle movements respectively) occur here.

The ligaments of the ankle joint are comprised mainly of the collateral ligaments, both medial (inner) and lateral (outer). These are extremely important in the stability of the ankle itself.

Lateral Collateral Ligament

The lateral collateral ligament prevents excessive inversion. It is considerably weaker than the larger medial ligament and thus sprains to the lateral ligament are much more common. It is made up of 3 individual bands:

Anterior talofibular ligament (AFTL): passes from the fibula to the front of the talus bone.
Calcaneofibular ligament (CFL)- connects the calcaneus and the fibula
Posterior talofibular Ligament (PTFL)- passes from the back of the fibula to the rear surface of the calcaneus.

Medial Collateral Ligament

The medial ligament (also known as the deltoid ligament) is considerably thicker than the lateral ligament and spreads out in a fan shape to cover the distal (bottom) end of the tibia and the inner surfaces of the talus, navicular, and calcaneus.

Symptoms of Ankle Injury

The location and severity of ankle pain may vary, depending on the cause of the problem. Signs and symptoms that sometimes accompany ankle pain include:

  • Pain
  • Swelling and stiffness
  • Redness and warmth to the touch
  • Weakness or instability
  • Popping or crunching noises
  • Inability to fully move the ankle
  • Inability to weight bear on the ankle
  • Locking

For patients suffering from ankle pain, the first step to recovery is to receive a proper diagnosis so the cause of the symptoms can be determined.

If you feel you have a potential infection in the ankle or a fracture, urgent medical attention should be sought.

Causes of Ankle Pain

There are a number of ankle conditions which cause ankle pain. It is important to make an accurate diagnosis of the cause of your symptoms so that appropriate treatment can be directed at the cause.

  • Achilles tendinitis
  • Achilles tendon rupture
  • Avulsion fracture
  • Broken ankle/broken foot
  • Bursitis
  • Gout
  • Osteoarthritis
  • Osteochondritis dissecans
  • Plantar fasciitis
  • Pseudogout
  • Psoriatic arthritis
  • Reactive arthritis
  • Rheumatoid arthritis
  • Septic arthritis
  • Sprained ankle
  • Stress fractures
  • Tarsal tunnel syndrome

With all ankle conditions the most important part of treatment is getting your ankle injury correctly diagnosed.  We achieve this by conducting comprehensive examinations of the ligaments, cartilage, muscles and tendons in and around the ankle joint.

As part of our multi-disciplinary team, our specialists have access to MRI facilities.

Investigations for Ankle Pain and Injury

Like every joint evaluation, the start to a diagnosis is a consultation followed by a physical examination. Your specialist will inspect your ankle for swelling, pain, tenderness, warmth and visible bruising. A visual assessment is followed by evaluation of the movement and specific orthopaedic tests to determine integrity.

After a provisional diagnosis is made by your specialist, it may be suggested you have the joint imaged by:

  • X-ray
  • MRI Scan
  • CT Scan
  • Ultrasound

If your specialist suspects an infection or arthritis you may be recommended a series of have blood tests .

On rare occasions your specialist may request a nerve conduction study to look for nerve injury and compression.

Treatments for Ankle Pain

Throughout your diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation, dedicated team members will continue to work hard to ensure you can get back to enjoying life with the most comfort, mobility, and functionality possible.

Healthplus Clinics has assembled a group of Ankle Pain Specialists to provide complete surgical and non-surgical treatments. Our team of Ankle Specialists includes: Ankle Surgeons, Pain Specialists, Podiatrists, and specially trained Ankle Physiotherapists.

Non-Surgical Ankle Treatments and Procedures

  • Specialist Ankle Physiotherapy
  • Gait Analysis and Biomechanical Examination
  • Orthotics Prescription
  • Shockwave Therapy
  • Ankle Acupuncture
  • Electrotherapy

Ankle Pain Management Procedures

  • Joint Injection

Surgical Ankle Treatments and Procedures

  • Achilles repair
  • Ankle cartilage transplant, harvesting, cultivation and transplant
  • Ankle fusion
  • Ankle replacement (ankle arthroplasty)
  • Arthroscopic foot and ankle surgery
  • Athrolysis, elongation of the Achilles
  • Bunion surgery
  • Endoscopic Plantar Fascia Release
  • Fasciooctomy of the foot
  • Ligament repair
  • Metal Plate removal after bunion surgery
  • Metatarsophalangeal Arthroscopy
  • Metatarsophalangeal Prosthesis
  • Mortons neuroma excision
  • Retrocalcaneal bursae removal/drainage
  • Subtalar Arthrodesis
Complications of Ankle Pain and Injury

Chronic pain

Once your ligaments are stretched or torn, they need about eight weeks to be fully healed and are pain free. But other problems might go undiagnosed, like a bone fracture, tear in the cartilage, nerve damage or a torn tendon. Delaying treatment of these other conditions leads to continued pain, weakness, giving way and disruption of your normal daily activities.

Instability of the Ankle Joint

An ankle sprain can heal incorrectly, leaving your ligaments permanently stretched. This causes your ankle to be weak and unstable, frequently resulting in abnormal movement. If this happens, you will are likely to recurrently sprain causing swelling and pain.

Stiffness

Stiffness usually happens because of severe inflammation swelling at the site of the injury and scar tissue. Stiffness most often results in pain and even osteoarthritis.

Swelling

When the ankle does not heal properly, localized swelling occurs causing a limited range of motion and an inability to participate in your usual routine.

Early onset arthritis in the Ankle Joint

When a joint functions incorrectly following injury there is a possibility that over a period of time premature arthritis can occur.

Most patients will not encounter problems after orthopaedic surgery. As with any surgery, however, there are potential risks, including: reaction to anesthesia, bleeding, infection, blood clots, nerve damage, lack of full range of motion, development of arthritis, scar formation, or re-injury of the joint or soft tissue.

Advice with Ankle Sprain

In the first 48 to 72 hours after your injury, it’s important to follow the PRICE procedure. Many minor sprains and strains will respond well to this.

Protect your injury from further harm.
Rest your injury for the first two to three days, and then re-introduce movement so you don’t lose too much muscle strength.
Ice the injured area using an ice pack or ice wrapped in a towel to reduce swelling and bruising. Don’t apply ice directly to your skin as it can damage your skin.
Compress the area by bandaging it to support the injury and help reduce swelling. The bandage should fit snugly but not be too tight, and you should remove it before going to sleep.
Elevate the injured area above the level of your heart to control swelling. Keep the area supported and try to keep it elevated as much as possible until the swelling goes down.
If your injury doesn’t improve, it’s important to seek advice from a professional.

For the first 72 hours there are certain things you should not do. These can be remembered using HARM.

Heat. Don’t use heat packs, hot water bottles or heat rubs on the affected area, as well as saunas or hot baths. Heat encourages blood to flow to the area, the opposite effect of using ice.
Alcohol. Don’t drink alcohol because it can increase bleeding and swelling to the area, slowing down the healing process.
Running or any other form of strenuous exercise. Such activities may cause more damage.
Massage. This can increase bleeding and swelling.

What’s next

  • Call Now

    0800 043 7103

    Our phone lines are open 24 hours a day, call now to book an Appointment.

  • Book an appointment

    Book an appointment online and avoid the disappointment of not getting treatment.

  • Request a call back

    If you are unable to book an appointment now or would like further information, arrange a call back.

  • RECOGNISED BY ALL MAJOR HEALTH INSURANCE COMPANIES Including: BUPA & AXA PPP

    Read More
  • Read More
  • 0%

    FINANCE
    AVAILABLE ON
    SELECTED SELF-PAY
    TREATMENT

    Read More

Emergency and weekend Appointments

For immediate & emergency appointments, please contact us on 0800 043 7103

Sign up to our Newsletter

what our patients say about us...